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Native American and Arctic Health

Overview:

Over the last two plus decades, PIs Dombrowski, Khan and Whitbeck have worked with and in Native American and Arctic communities across North America on issues of health, culture, traditional lifeways, healing traditions, and community well-being.

This work has changed our teams and our outlooks on the research process. As we move into the latter half of our third decade in this work, we continue to look to the roots of our earlier years in Native American / American Indian and Inuit/Inupiat communities to help chart our way forward.

Recent Blog Posts for Native American and Aboriginal Health

REACH director Kirk Dombrowski recently contributed to a study on the cultural and health dynamics of Alaska Natives. Wide health

Postdoc Elspeth Ready gave a talk to the Department of Human Behavior, Ecology, and Culture at the Max Planck Institute

It has been consistently found in Aboriginal communities that the continuation of cultural traditions of is vital to the maintenance, resilience,

REACH Lab's Jerreed Ivanich and Kirk Dombrowski joined University of Alaska-Fairbanks partners in collecting baseline fieldwork on the Qungasvik Project

2016 Kirk Dombrowski, Patrick Habecker, G. Robin Gauthier, Joshua Moses, and Bilal Khan, “Relocation Redux: Labrador Inuit population movements and

Creating a Community of Practice to Prevent Suicide Through Multiple Channels: Describing the Theoretical Foundations and Structured Learning of PC

Funded Projects:

Currently our projects concerned with Native American and Aboriginal health include “Developing Effective Proximal Care to Prevent Rural Alaska Native Youth Suicide” (R34 MH096884) and “Promoting Community Conversations about Research to End Native Youth Suicide in Rural Alaska” National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health (R01 MH112458). Both of these projects are collaborations with Dr. Lisa Wexler at the University of Massachusetts. Other grants include the “Qungasvik (Toolbox): Prevention of Alcohol/Suicide Risk in Alaska Native Youth” led by our collaborator Stacy Rasmus at U Alaska Fairbanks.  Recent prior work includes “Informal Social Networks in Two Labrador Communities” funded by the National Science Foundation, Division of Arctic Social Sciences ARC-0908155. This project took place in Labrador Canada, from 2009-2013.